A book to help black girls love their natural hair

Anita Grant says she and her hair have had a complicated relationship for 20 years.

j’ai cessé de me soucier de mes cheveux naturels et je ne les ai jamais montrés à personne en dehors de ma famille”,”text”:”Je me lissais religieusement les cheveux et quand je suis arrivée au secondaire […] j’ai cessé de me soucier de mes cheveux naturels et je ne les ai jamais montrés à personne en dehors de ma famille”}}”>I straightened my hair religiously and when I got to high school […] I stopped caring about my natural hair and never showed it to anyone outside my familyshe told CBC Hamilton.

But at the start of the pandemic, the 28-year-old Hamiltonian said the way she looked at her hair — or her crown, as she calls it — changed.

I was really able to touch, feel, experience and build a relationship with my crown Mrs. Grant said.

Then she learned that she was going to have her first child.

I have committed to raising my daughter to love every part of herself, especially her crownShe said.

: \”Pourquoi ne pas faire un livre pour que cette expérience soit vraiment amusante et positive pour elle?\””,”text”:”Je me suis dit: \”Pourquoi ne pas faire un livre pour que cette expérience soit vraiment amusante et positive pour elle?\””}}”>I thought to myself, “Why don’t I make a book to make this experience really fun and positive for her?”

Two years later, Mrs. Grant published the book hello hair.

More than 100 haircuts

The book tells the story of four best friends who go to a hair salon and learn about their hair.

The book includes more than 100 poetry stories. Photo: Radio Canada/Bobby Hristova/CBC

The characters in the book are inspired by members of Mrs. Grant’s family, including her daughter.

There are more than 100 poetry stories in the book.

The book was published on July 3, the same day it was published National Crown Day in the United States of America. This day marks the anniversary of California signing legislation in 2019 to end racial discrimination based on a person’s hair and Creating a respectable and open world for natural hair.

Ms. Grant says the book took three years to create and cost more than $30,000.

There are currently 2000 copies. In Hamilton, it is sold exclusively at ArkCollectiveClose to James Street North and Rebecca Street.

Lohifa Pogoson-Acker, a professional hairstylist in Hamilton, said the book would help many people appreciate their natural hair rather than straightening it and taking a Eurocentric approach.

Photo by Lohifa Bogosun Aker.

Mrs. Grant’s book is very important, says Lohifa Bojoson-Aker. Photo: Radio Canada/Bobby Hristova/CBC

% significatif et pertinent. […] J’aurais aimé avoir un livre comme celui-ci quand j’étais plus jeune”,”text”:”[C’est un livre] 100% significatif et pertinent. […] J’aurais aimé avoir un livre comme celui-ci quand j’étais plus jeune”}}”>[C’est un livre] 100% purposeful and relevant. […] I wish I had a book like this when I was youngerMrs. Bogoson Acker for CBC Hamilton.

It is important to teach our little girls to accept themselves and explore the diversity of texture [de leurs cheveux]she added.

Ms. Grant said she wants the next generation of black girls to love their natural hair more than I love her own.

It is part of our identity. […] This can affect your self-esteem.

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