Meet the Cherry Morello Djely Tapa at the Musiques Métisses . Festival

After years of restraint, the Musiques Métisses Festival did not miss its return with a large crowd coming to Angouleme to enjoy its three days of music and literature in the rural setting of Chais Magelis. Delighted to rediscover the sensations of live music, festival-goers rocked, sang and danced on an eclectic program as ambitious as it was.

Gaël Faye, New York Collectives Underground System, Antibalas, Reunionese Christine Salem and above all the supergroup Abraham Inc (David Krakauer, Fred Wesley, Socalled) took the audience on the big stage into festive ecstasy while the more intimate garden Stage showcased its share of exciting discoveries With concerts by Awan Kim and The Dairy Jazz, Daphne Kritaras, Mixi, Dudlin, Lucas Santana, and Gili Tapa.

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We met “Montreal Cherry” who came before her new album this February to present the titles of her award-winning album. Barokan In an energetic show that begins with a thunderous rhythmic groove before escaping into the afro-futuristic sounds of the die-hard singer with a glowing voice.

How do you find your place in this wonderful group of artists and ancients?

It is true that my heritage is heavy, I am descended from a long line of strong women and great voices, you have to find your voice and your guidance. It was tough because I am the daughter of the great singer Kandia Koyati and until now there has always been this comparison. I chose my own path by avoiding repetition, simply revisiting traditional repertoire but instead by presenting my contemporary world view.

Did this musical vision originate in Montreal?

Yes, thanks to the many encounters like Lamine Touré that brought me into the world of Montreal arts to be the city’s sour cherry. It opened doors for me, allowed me to practice my music and meet artists from diverse cultures and musical styles. Several musicians came from the Quebec scene to enrich my strong heritage such as Afrikana Soul Sister or Jean-François Lemieux and Caleb Rimtobaye, alias Afrotonix, for electronic music.

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How did you deal with this afro-futuristic music?

It all started with the rejection of this aphrodisiac of Caleb and myself. As if a single word could set the rhythms of an entire continent. Every small village, every corner of Africa has its own identity and rhythms. For me, the afro-rhythm corresponds to the way of walking, to work in society, to the rhythm of women who bring water, who hammer millet. As a child I would walk with a beat, I would sing with a beat, it was my Afro rhythm. It all started from there: how to find your African rhythm and bring it into the present and see how this traditional music can change in time and space. To this Afro-futuristic meditation, there are historical, temporal and spatial dimensions.

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You mentioned the tunes. Which one is used in the album?

My texts are written in Malenke, Kasonke and Bambara, the languages ​​spoken in the Kayes region, where I come from. As for the music, I am inspired a lot by the rhythms of Perico, the rhythms of my grandmother’s mother. Everything depends on the rhythm, everything rests on the clapping of hands and gourds. I compose in a traditional way, and use the traditional scale to write music that isn’t. I find it extraordinary to be able to use my words today and contemporary music starting with the art of griot.

In this disc, the issue of the status of women is present everywhere.

Yes, in Mali for example, this situation has receded. Historically, women have held a great position in Mandinka society. In this long history of our civilization we must not forget that the first government placed 18 women under the rule of the Soundiata Keita in the thirteenth century. But we must also be wary of the Western view of our African societies, mentalities, and customs. That’s why I’m not talking about problems like forced marriage, which has been fought over so much, I’d rather sing about the power of women in our societies.

How can someone who lives in the West judge someone who lives in Africa by its mores and habits? Mindsets are not the same, as we make women doubt their strength, the color of their skin, the texture of their hair or even their clothes. They need to restore confidence and restore that strength.

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I released the title in April Do you know ? On ignorance and intolerance

I live in Quebec and Native American women in Canada disappear, suffering violence in indifference. In general, we wake up every morning hearing cases of murder of women on the radio, in France or the United States, or at home. People can no longer live together, that’s enough, we have to talk about it. There is no place for violence in any home anywhere.

The musical style on stage which is different from the album also allows you to share these messages

Yes we are in a festival, a place of celebration. It is a matter of welcoming the festival-goers well because we will discuss together. We immediately invite them to the many cool and danceable tracks before sharing ideas to a quieter electric acoustic beat and then head back to the party. Even if we’re in low formation, two members lost, I have a chance to tour with Karim Montreal musicians, guitarist Asani Seck, drummer Donald Dugbo who just released a jazz fusion album Copley and bassist Jonathan Arsenault. All are in high demand, works on many projects and travels extensively. Everyone brings their being to create this mixed expression of music.

Djili Tapa and his music - Metis Music
Djili Tapa and his music – Metis Music

© Radio France
– clouds chenne

To listen again:
Métis Music Festival Special

listening:
“Home”, the deep song of Gili Tapa

listening:
“Le Tioko – Tioko” the forgotten album of Mali Idrissa Somoro

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